wood worm
Woodworm - Common Furniture Beetle - Anobium Punctatum

Woodworm – Common Furniture Beetle – Anobium Punctatum

Common Furniture Beetle (Anobium Punctatum)

Timber attacked:

  • Sapwood of soft and hard timbers and older plywood
  • Modern plywood and tropical hardwoods are generally immune

Damage:

  • Severe, extensive tunnelling that generally follows the grain of the timber
  • Treatable

Signs:

  • Lots of gritty, uniformly-coloured dust that can be easily knocked from the timber
  • Round tunnels generally running with the grain
  • Round flight holes on the timber’s surface of approximately 1-2mm diameter

Death Watch Beetle (Xestobium Rufovillosum)

Timber attacked:

  • Hardwoods like oak or elm with some degree of physical decay
  • Softwoods where significant decay is present and when it is located close to the aforementioned hardwoods

Damage:

  • Severe, extensive tunnelling that is more evident internally
  • Treatable

Signs:

  • Large and gritty pellets of dust (frass) of a uniform colour
  • Round tunnels with a lot of dust
  • Round flight holes on timber’s surface of approximately 3mm diameter

Woodboring Weevils (Pentarthrum Huttoni Euophryum Confine)

Timber attacked:

  • Well decayed, aged hardwoods and softwoods

Damage:

  • Tunnelling with the grain of the timber due to larvae and adult beetle activity
  • Tunnels frequently break the surface of the timber

Signs:

  • Lots of gritty, uniformly-coloured dust that can be easily knocked from the timber
  • Round tunnels generally running with the grain and breaking the surface
  • Round, jagged flight holes on timber’s surface of approximately 1mm diameter

Powder Post Beetle (Lyctus Brunneus)

Timber attacked:

  • Sapwood of wide-pored hardwoods like oak with high starch levels
  • Obeche core in plywood
  • Timber over 10 years old achieve immunity due to starch depletion of the natural ageing process

Damage:

  • Severe tunnelling in the sapwood, with the grain in the early stages
  • Sapwood may be totally disintegrated with only a thin, sound surface to timber
  • Treatable

Signs:

  • A smooth, flour-like dust that can be easily knocked from the timber
  • Round tunnels which frequently intersect, often following the grain in early stages
  • Round flight holes on timber’s surface of approximately 1-2mm diameter

House Longhorn Beetle (Hylotrupes Bajulus)

Timber attacked:

  • The sapwood of softwoods

Damage:

  • Severe tunnelling that often coalesces
  • Sapwood may be totally destroyed leaving a thin veneer surface that may appear corrugated
  • The tunnel is full of frass and often exhibits fine ridges
  • Treatable

Signs:

  • Sausage-shaped pellets (frass) readily visible to the naked eye and easily shaken from the timber
  • Large, oval-shaped tunnels that often coalesce
  • Oval, jagged flight holes on timber’s surface of approximately 6-10mm diameter

Wharf Borer (Nacerdes Melanura)

Timber attacked:

  • Severely decayed, aged hardwoods and softwoods
  • Softwood is reported to be preferred

Damage:

  • Severe tunnelling in rotted wood
  • The tunnel is full of mud-like frass and coarse fibres
  • Tunnels generally follow the grain of the timber

Signs:

  • Mud-like frass with clutches of coarse fibre
  • Large, oval-shaped tunnels that often coalesce
  • Oval, jagged flight holes on timber’s surface of approximately 6-7mm diameter

Bark (Waney Edge) Borer (Ernobius Mollis)

Timber attacked:

  • Seasoned and partly seasoned timber with bark present
  • The presence of bark is required to initiate an attack

Damage:

  • Surface scoring to outer sapwood, some holes present
  • Most damage is present in the bark

Signs:

  • Gritty, round-shaped pellets of a uniform colour
  • Round tunnels mainly in the bark
  • Round flight holes of approximately 2mm diameter

Wood Wasp (Urocerus Gigas)

Timber attacked:

  • Softwoods of newly felled logs and unhealthy trees
  • This forest insect will not attack seasoned wood

Damage:

  • Discrete tunnels with hard-packed fibrous frass

Signs:

  • A coarse, fibrous frass which is hard to remove from tunnels
  • Large, round, smooth-edged tunnels of good separation
  • Round flight holes of approximately 6-7mm diameter

Fan Bearing Wood Borer (Ptilinus Pectinicornis)

Timber attacked:

  • The sapwood of certain European hardwoods like oak
  • It is rarely found in furniture

Damage:

  • Severe tunnelling in the sapwood, going with the grain in early stages. Similar to Powder Post Beetle but frass is extremely hard packed
  • Sapwood may be totally disintegrated with only a thin, sound surface to the timber

Signs:

  • A smooth, flour-like dust that cannot be knocked from the timber and requires digging out
  • Round tunnels full of hard frass
  • Round flight holes on timber surface of approximately 2mm diameter

Pinhole Borers (There are numerous types of Ambrosia Beetle)

Timber attacked:

  • Newly felled logs of hardwoods and softwoods
  • This forest insect will not attack seasoned wood

Damage:

  • Tunnelling due to female adult activity is found across the grain
  • Blue or black staining to tunnel wall

Signs:

  • No frass
  • Round tunnels of varying size
  • Round, black-stained entry holes that vary in size
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10:21 AM May 8th|@garrattsdamp